Our mental and emotional health is extremely important. In fact, it may be the most important aspect of our health, as research has demonstrated that over 85% of our physical disease comes from “dis-ease” on the mental or emotional level. When our mental and emotional bodies are healthy, our immune system is stronger, so we can not only ward off disease easier, but we have less physical pain, and life is so much more enjoyable.

CHALLENGES THAT CAN BE HELPED WITH HYPNOSIS INCLUDE:
  • Anxious Mood
  • Depressed Mood
  • Fear of Public Speaking
  • Feeling Stuck
  • General Stress and Overwhelm
  • Grief
  • Lack of Motivation
  • Low Self-Esteem or Self-Confidence
  • Mental Confusion
  • Relationship Loss
  • Relationship Stress
  • Social Phobias
  • Work Stress
  • and many others!

Hypnosis may well be able to help you feel much better. How, you ask? The truth is that in our core there is total health – mental, emotional, physical and spiritual health. For some, this may be very hard to believe, but it’s true. Unfortunately, most of us live in the layers of fear and sadness that cover that inner state of health and think that despair is our only option or it’s who we truly are. Because our subconscious is our emotional mind, it can literally find and release those layers of emotion that are clouding our feelings of well-being. Not only that, but our subconscious can easily help us find and understand the origins of our “dis-ease”, most of which comes from our misperceptions about ourselves and others. A classic example of a universal misperception is the fear “I’m not good enough or not as good as.” In my experience, this misperception can wreak havoc on all levels. The good news is that it can be cleared, and the truth of all that we are can be brought to light, which is, without exception, a wonderfully enlightening and uplifting experience. You do not have to feel the way you’re feeling right now forever. There is absolutely a light at the end of the tunnel and that light is within you.

IMPORTANT NOTE:

By law in the State of Connecticut all psychological issues require a referral from a doctor, psychologist, psychiatrist or social worker. In addition, hypnosis is never a diagnostic tool, nor in this environment is it considered therapy, as therapy takes place at the conscious level and only with an individual who is licensed and qualified to provide therapy. All hypnosis is self-hypnosis is a dialog with the subconscious mind and is designed to release blocks that are currently in the way of your mental and emotional health. Your health is within; hypnosis will help you access it.

Supporting Research
93% Recovery Rate with Hypnosis.

“We find that for psychoanalysis we can expect a recovery rate of 38% after approximately 600 sessions. For Wolpian therapy, we can expect a recovery rate of 72% after an average of 22 sessions, and for hypnotherapy we can expect a recovery rate of 93% after an average of 6 sessions.” Review of prior studies by Alfred Barrios 1960’s

Hypnosis Provides Greater Improvement Rates than Psychotherapy Alone.

18 separate studies found that patients who received cognitive behavioral therapy plus hypnosis for disorders such as obesity, insomnia, anxiety and hypertension showed greater improvement than 70 percent of the patients who received psychotherapy alone.

Hypnotic Help For Depression and Anxiety.

In a neurochemical study of Hypnotic control of pain conducted by Domangue (1985), following Hypnotherapy, there were clinically and statistically significant decreases in depression, anxiety and pain, and increases in beta endorphin-like substances.

Hypnosis Dramatically Affects Self-Esteem.

In a research study done with 60 college student volunteers (Spring of 2004 at Northern Arizona University, Flagstaff, Arizona), using hypnosis with ego-enhancement suggestions showed “significantly dramatic effects” in brain-wave patterns, subjective sense of self-confidence, and test scores. American Journal of Clinical Hypnotherapy (a publication of the American Psychological Association) 2004 Apr;46(4):281-97)